Where did the water come from during Noah’s Flood?

Where did the water come from during Noah’s Flood?  Where did it go?

The Bible tells us in Genesis chapters 6 – 8 that mankind had become exceedingly wicked, and rebellious against their Creator, the Lord God.  His mercy and grace are balanced with His law and justice, so He sent a flood to destroy the whole earth and all land dwelling creatures from the earth, except for those on the Ark, which Noah was commanded to build.

Some people do not believe there was enough water to cover the entire earth.  But, the Bible clearly states that the waters covered the whole earth, even the “high mountains everywhere were covered…” by at least 20 feet, resulting in the complete destruction of all land dwelling creatures (including humans) not on the Ark (see chpt. 6:17–24).

Here are a few examples of physical evidence existing that show such a deluge is possible:

The earth is over 70% covered by water at the present time.

Volcanic gas eruptions are usually mostly water (in vapor form), the source of which is often groundwater – water located beneath the surface of the earth.  Read Genesis 7:11 to find out how this relates to subterranean water chambers in Noah’s Flood.

If the topography of the earth were flat (or close to it), water would cover the entire surface by more than a mile!

Where did the water go?

Psalm 104 tells us that “…the waters stood above the mountains.  At [God’s] rebuke they fled; at the sound of [His] thunder they took to flight. The mountains rose, the valleys sank down to the place that [He] appointed for them. [He] set a boundary that they may not pass, so that they might not again cover the earth.”

This seems to tell us exactly what we observe today, that is that as the mountains formed from continental plates crashing into each other during and after the flood, all the flood waters rushed into the newly created ocean basins, with lakes, rivers and other bodies of water being formed at that time as well.

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